Facebook Twitter Pinterest

Featured Listing:
Flora Medica
Flora Medica, founded 1992 by nurse aromatherapist and author Valerie Cooksley, provides pure essential oils for clinical use; unique and effective aromatherapy and other wellness products and a nationally accredited aromatherapy home study course.

Trusted Essential Oil & Aromatherapy Resource Since 1997:

Advanced Search | Sitemap

Allspice Essential Oil

Allspice Essential Oil

Allspice Essential Oil is also known as Pimento Berry Essential Oil. The warm, spicy aroma of Allspice Essential Oil is similar to that of clove and cinnamon essential oils. The high content of Eugenol is partly responsible for this similarity.

Allspice Berries

Allspice Oil is a wonderful oil to use in the diffuser during the fall and winter. If used at full-strength, it can be a potent mucous membrane irritant, so it's best blended at a low ratio with other essential oils before diffusing. I particularly like Allspice Oil blended with Orange Oil or Bergamot Oil. Allspice Essential Oil's high Eugenol (a phenol) content suggests that Allspice may act as an anti-viral oil.

Allspice Essential Oil, in small dilutions, is said to act as an aphrodisiac. Its rich, warm aroma also complements masculine blends.

Allspice Essential Oil

Although Allspice Essential Oil is regarded for its use within personal fragrancing, massage, arthritic and muscular applications, Allspice Oil can be a dermal irritant. If you choose to use Allspice Oil within topical applications, be certain to dilute it very well (see safety info shown below).

Botanical Name

Pimenta dioica / Pimenta officinalis

Common Method of Extraction

Steam Distilled

Plant Part Typically Used

Berries

Color

Cocoa Brown

Consistency

Thin

Perfumery Note

Middle

Strength of Initial Aroma

Strong

Aromatic Description

Allspice Essential Oil is sharp yet sweet with a spicy, cinnamon and clove-like aroma.

Allspice Essential Oil Uses

Arthritis, muscle tone, stiffness, rheumatism, muscular and gastric cramps, indigestion, nausea, depression, nervous tension/exhaustion, neuralgia, coughs, bronchitis. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 60-65, 194.]

Major Constituents

Eugenol
1,8-Cineole
B-Caryophyllene
a-Caryophyllene
Methyleugenol
Gamma-Cadinenel
Caryophyllene oxide

[B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1976-1978 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1979), 72. B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1988-1991 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1993), 86-87. B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1988-1991 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1995), 184.C.L. Green, F. Espinosa, Jamaican and Central American pimento (Allspice, Pimenta dioica): Characterization of Flavor Differences and Other Distinguishing Features. (Amsterdam: Elsevier, 1988). A.O. Tucker, M.J. Maciarello, L.R. Landrun, Volatile Leaf Oils of Caribbean Myrtacea. Three Varieties of Pimenta racemosa (Miller) J. Moore of the Dominican Republic and the Commercial Bay Oil. J. Essential Oil Res. 3, 195-196. Sources cited in Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 393.]

Safety Information

Numerous sources indicate that Allspice Oil can act as a mucous membrane irritant. Tisserand and Young recommend a dermal maximum of 0.15%. They indicate that it may interfere with blood clotting. Reading Tisserand and Young's full profile is recommended. [Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 393.]

Shelf Life

View Shelf Life Information

Important Information About the Profiles

The essential oil information provided on AromaWeb is intended for educational purposes only. The references to safety information, constituents and percentages is generalized information. The data is not necessary complete and is not guaranteed to be accurate. The essential oil photos are intended to represent the typical and approximate color of each essential oil. However, essential oil color can vary based on harvesting, distillation, age of the essential oil and other factors. Profiles for several absolutes are included within the directory, and are denoted as such.

General Safety Information

Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children. It is safest to consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children. For in-depth information on oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young.

Essential Oil Book Suggestions

Click on a book's title to view details and read a full review for the book. Visit AromaWeb's Books area to find details about many other essential oil and aromatherapy books.

Essential Oil Safety

Own Safety Profiles for 400 Essential Oils and 206 Constituents:
Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals
Authors: Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young

The Complete Book Of Essential Oils & Aromatherapy

The Complete Book Of Essential Oils & Aromatherapy
Author: Valerie Ann Worwood

The Complete Aromatherapy & Essential Oils Handbook for Everyday Wellness

The Complete Aromatherapy & Essential Oils Handbook for Everyday Wellness
Author: Nerys Purchon and Lora Cantele

The Heart of Aromatherapy

The Heart of Aromatherapy
Author: Andrea Butje

AromaWeb Logo

Let's Stay Connected!

Like/Follow AromaWeb:

Connect on FacebookFollow AromaWeb on TwitterPinterest

Share This Page:

Please pin or share the below image: