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Home Page > Essential Oil Profiles > Rosemary Essential Oil

Rosemary Essential Oil

Rosemary Essential Oil ProfileInvigorating. Refreshing. Stimulating. These are the first three words that come to mind when I think of Rosemary Essential Oil. When I was first exploring aromatherapy back in the 1990s, Rosemary Oil took me by surprise. I was expecting it to smell closely to the freshly cut herb, but Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosmarinus officinalis var camphor) smells much more camphorous. As with other oils that contain camphor, Rosemary is helpful in massage and arthritis blends and can help improve circulation. It is useful for respiratory issues and makes a good expectorant/decongestant.

Rosemary has an excellent reputation for oily skin/acne, scalp and hair care, and I have repeatedly read that Rosemary Oil can be helpful with alopecia (hair loss).

Rosemary is quite stimulating and is heralded for help in memory retention and staying focused and alert. Rosemary is a good choice for blends for driving long distances and for long study sessions.

Several important Rosemary chemotypes are worth paying close attention to:

Rosemary Verbenone (Rosmarinus officinalis var verbenone aka Rosmarinus officinalis ct. verbenone) contains less camphor and is widely regarded as being safer to use within topical applications. The aroma is more herbaceous and is preferred by many.

Rosemary Cineole (Rosmarinus officinalis var cineole aka Rosmarinus officinalis ct. cineole) is sometimes preferred for use in respiratory and circulatory issues.

Rosemary Oil
Rosemary Oil
    

Botanical Name: Rosmarinus officinalis

Common Method of Extraction: Steam Distilled

Part Typically Used: Leaves and Flowers/Buds

Color: Clear

Consistency: Thin

Perfumery Note: Middle

Strength of Initial Aroma: Medium - Strong

Aromatic Description: Fresh, herbaceous, sweet, slightly medicinal.

Rosemary Sprigs

Rosemary Sprigs

Rosemary Oil Uses: Aching muscles, arthritis, dandruff, dull skin, exhaustion, gout, hair care, muscle cramping, neuralgia, poor circulation, rheumatism. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 56-67.]

Constituents: Cineole, Pinene, Borneol, Linalol, Alpha-Terpineol, Terpinen-4-ol, Bornyl Acetate, Camphor, Thujone, Camphene, Limonene, Beta-Caryophyllene [Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-5.]

Safety Information: Avoid Rosemary Oil in pregnancy and epilepsy. [Robert Tisserand, Essential Oil Safety (United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone, 1995), 165.]

Avoid Rosemary Oil in cases of hypertension. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 209.]

There is a remote possibility that Rosemary Oil could potentially raise blood sugar levels. [Al-Hander A, Hasan Z. 1994. Hyperglycemic and insulin release inhibitory effects of Rosmarinus officinalis. Journal of Ethnopharmacology. 43(3) 217-211 --- Cited by Jane Buckle, Clinical Aromatherapy: Essential Oils in Practice (Philadelphia, PA: Churchill Livingstone, 2003), 300-301.]

Important Notes: The essential oil information provided within the Essential Oil Properties & Profiles area is intended for educational purposes only. This data is not considered complete and is not guaranteed to be accurate. The oil photos are intended to represent the typical and approximate color of each essential oil. However, oil color can vary based on harvesting, distillation and other factors. Profiles for several absolutes are included within the directory, and are denoted as such.

General Safety Information: Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children and give children only the gentlest oils at extremely low doses. It is safest to consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children. For in-depth information on oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young.

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Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young

The second edition of Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young is a 784-page powerhouse of information that is invaluable to the serious aromatherapy student, aromatherapy practitioner, health care professional, and everyone seriously interested in understanding individual essential oils, their constituents, usage guidelines, safety precautions and contraindications.
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Rosemary Essential Oil Profile

 

 


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