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Home Page > Aromatherapy Articles & Guides > The Parts of Plants That Produce Essential Oil

The Parts of Plants That Produce Essential Oil

Essential Oils and Aromatherapy for DiabetesWithin this article, I loosely refer to all volatile aromatherapy oils including essential oils, absolutes and CO2s collectively as "essential oils."

Some botanicals store their precious essential oil within their leaves or flowers while others may store the beneficial oil within their rinds, seeds or other plant parts.

Not all plants produce enough essential oil to justify the commercial cost of extracting them oil. Additionally, the essential oils produced by some plants have no known therapeutic value or can even be hazardous. As more is discovered about the safety and therapeutic benefits of particular essential oils and as consumer/B2B demand grows for particular essential oils, availability can change.

The below list is offered as a guideline to the essential oils and absolutes that are commonly distilled/extracted from the listed plant part type. Please don't consider this list as being complete. It is possible to sometimes find essential oils produced from other parts of the botanical or produced using material from multiple parts of a plant.

Bay, Bay Laurel, Bergamot Mint, Cajeput, Cinnamon, Eucalyptus, Geranium, Kanuka, Lemon Myrtle, Manuka, Myrtle, Niaouli, Patchouli, Petitgrain, Ravensara, Saro, Tea Tree, Tobacco, Violet

Flowering Herbs (Typical Distillation of Both Flowers and Leaves):
Basil, Catnip, Clary Sage, Holy Basil, Hyssop, Lavender, Lavendin, Lemon Balm (Melissa), Marjoram, Oregano, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Spearmint, Thyme, Yarrow

Boronia, Cananga, Chamomile (all), Clove, Davana, Helichrysum, Jasmine, Linden Blossom, Neroli, Rose, Tagetes, Tuberose, Ylang Ylang

Amyris, Cedarwood (all), Palo Santo, Rosewood (Endangered), Sandalwood (Endangered)

Cassia, Cinnamon

Cypress, Fir, Scotch Pine, Spruce

, Lemongrass, Palmarosa

Benzoin, Peru Balsam, Elemi, Frankincense, Galbanum, Gurjum, Myrrh

Allspice, Black Pepper, Juniper Berry, May Chang (Litsea Cubeba)

Citrus Rinds:
, Grapefruit, Lemon, Lime, Mandarin, Orange, Tangerine, Yuzi

Angelica, Ginger, Spikenard, Vetiver

, Anise, Cardamom, Carrot, Coffee Bean, Coriander, Cumin, Dill, Fennel, Nutmeg, Parsley


Do Some Plants Yield Essential Oil From Multiple Parts of the Botanical That They are Derived From?

Absolutely. For example, an essential oil can be distilled from both the root and the seeds of the Angelica plant. Cinnamon Essential Oil is produced from either the bark or the leaves of the cinnamon tree. Some producers use only a plant's leaves, while some may use both the leaves and connecting twigs. It is helpful to know what part(s) of a plant were used in the production of an essential oil as the constituents, aroma and the therapeutic properties of the oil can vary.

Why are Some Seed Oils Classified as Essential Oils While Some Are Classified As Carrier Oils?

The method of extraction determines if a seed oil is an essential oil or a carrier oil (vegetable oil). If the seed oil was steam distilled, it is a volatile, aromatic essential oil. If the seed oil was cold pressed, it is a lipid-based carrier oil.

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